KEGG    Intestinal immune network for IgA production - Homo sapiens (human) Help
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The intestine is the largest lymphoid tissue in the body. One striking feature of intestinal immunity is its ability to generate great amounts of noninflammatory immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibodies that serve as the first line of defense against microorganisms. The basic map of IgA production includes induction of mucosal B cells in the Peyer's patches, circulation through the bloodstream and homing to intestinal mucosa of IgA-commited plasma cells, and local antibody production for export across the intestinal membranes. Multiple cytokines, including TGF-{beta}, IL-10, IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6, are required to promote IgA class switching and terminal differentiation process of the B cells. Secreted IgA promotes immune exclusion by entrapping dietary antigens and microorganisms in the mucus and functions for neutralization of toxins and pathogenic microbes.